NC 39 Weeks intro

 

FOX 50 and MIX 101.5 WRAL-FM are partnering with theMarch of Dimes, The North Carolina Center for Hospital Quality (The NC Quality Center) and Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina (PQCNC) to educate and re-educate women on the need to wait to deliver until 39 weeks. More and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for both mom and baby.

By waiting until 39 weeks to deliver…

  • Important organs, like your baby's brain, lungs and liver, get all the time they need to develop.
  • Your baby is less likely to have vision and hearing problems after birth. 
  • Babies born too soon often are too small. Babies born at a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small.
  • Babies can suck and swallow and stay awake long enough to eat after they're born. Babies born early sometimes can't do these things.

 

Ten Fingers, Ten Toes...

Babies need 39 Weeks in the womb to develop completely and gain weight. Among the risks for babies born too small are hypothermia, when core body temperature is too low for normal function and metabolism. Such babies may require time in a radiant warmer in a neonatal intensive care unit.

At 34 Weeks, the volume of the cerebral cortex - which controls higher-order functions such as cognition, perception, reason and motor control - is 53% of its volume at 39-40 Weeks.
Babies born before 39 Weeks are more likely to have vision and hearing problems after birth.
Babies born before 39 Weeks often can't learn to suck and swallow well, and they may not be able to stay awake long enough to eat.
Lungs may not be fully developed until 36-38 Weeks. Even when lungs are fully developed, deliveries between 36 Weeks and 38 Weeks six days, may still be associated with significantly increased respiratory problems.
Important growth in the liver occurs during the last weeks of pregnancy.
  
 
 

Inducing labor may not work... 
If your labor is induced, the medicine your doctor or certified nurse-midwife  gives you may not start your labor. When this happens, you may need to have a c-section. 

  • A c-section can cause problems for your baby. Babies born by c-section may have more breathing and other medical problems than babies born by vaginal birth. (Most babies are born by vaginal birth. The mother's uterus contracts to help push the baby out through the vagina, also called the birth canal.)
  • C-sections can cause problems in future pregnancies. Once you have a c-section, you may be more likely in future pregnancies to have a c-section. The more c-sections you have, the more problems you and your baby may have, including problems with the placenta.
  • A c-section is major surgery for mom. It takes longer for you to recover from a c-section than from a vaginal birth. You can expect to spend 2 to 4 days in the hospital after a c-section. Then you'll need 4 to 6 weeks after you go home to fully recover. You also could have complications from the surgery, like infections and bleeding.

Experts, including those from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG),  Childbirth Connections, and the March of Dimes, caution that the amount of time a baby needs to develop fully, which includes having a fully formed brain and organs, is at least 39 completed weeks. Sometimes there is a medical reason to schedule a newborn delivery before the 39th week. However, research finds that newborns were being "electively" scheduled for delivery before the 39th week, meaning without a medical reason, at alarming rates.


For Immediate Release
5/14/2012

FOX 50, MIX 101.5 FM AND THE MARCH OF DIMES
LAUNCH MAJOR HEALTHY BABY COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN

RALEIGH - FOX 50 (WRAZ TV) and MIX 101.5 (WRAL-FM) have partnered with the March of Dimes to create NC39weeks - the first ever local community campaign designed to create awareness and provide crucial information for moms, families and health care providers on the importance of waiting at least 39 weeks to deliver. 

According to the March of Dimes, more and more births are being scheduled too early for non-medical reasons which can lead to long-term health issues for both mom and baby. Among the reasons to wait at least 39 weeks: 

  • Important organs, like your baby's brain, lungs and liver, get all the time they need to develop.
  • Your baby is less likely to have vision and hearing problems after birth. 
  • Babies born too soon often are too small. Babies born at a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small.
  • Babies can suck and swallow and stay awake long enough to eat after they're born. Babies born early sometimes can't do these things. 

“Last spring, the March of Dimes approached us with this issue and asked for help in getting the word out to a mass audience,” said Tommy Schenck, VP and GM of FOX 50. “The goal is simple, promote healthy families and healthy babies. We got involved because it was the right thing to do.” 

NC39weeks is an interactive community initiative that includes TV and radio Public Service Announcements, a dedicated informational website – www.NC39weeks.com - and even the opportunity for moms to take the “NC39weeks Pledge”. 

NC39weeks is also supported by our community partners – The North Carolina Center for Hospital Quality (The Quality Center) and Patient Safety and the Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina (PQCNC).  

“We’re thrilled to be partnered with FOX 50, Mix 101.5, the North Carolina Quality Center and the March of Dimes in this public service campaign,” said Clinical Professor in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and Director of PQCNC Martin McCaffrey MD. “The partnership allows us to continue our efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality that occurs as a result of non-indicated deliveries less than 39 weeks.”  

“Our main focus is working with hospitals to improve perinatal safety,” said Director of The North Carolina Center for Hospital Quality and Patient Safety Carol Koeble MD, MS, CPE. “This campaign allows us to use our experience to ensure that all health care providers and expectant mothers have all the information needed to deliver a healthy child.” 

For more information about NC39weeks, please visit NC39weeks.com or contact FOX 50 Creative Services Director, Kevin Kolbe, at (919) 595-5103 or FOX 50 Director of Local Sales, Niel Sollod, at (919) 595-5153.


 

The North Carolina Center for Hospital Quality and Patient Safety (NC Quality Center) leads the state's hospitals to become the safest and highest quality hospitals in the United States.  Get more information at http://www.ncqualitycenter.org/

Perinatal+Quality+Collaborative+of+North+Carolina+%28PQCNC%29

Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina (PQCNC) is a community of organizations, agencies and individuals committed to making North Carolina the best place to be born. Get more information at pqcnc.org.

March+of+Dimes

March of Dimes is a champion for babies – those born healthy and those that need help to survive and thrive. Get more infomation at marchofdimes.com/northcarolina.